Powering up PPL’s STEM workforce

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs are growing faster than any other U.S. sector. Available jobs in the field are set to increase 17 percent between 2014 and 2024. How does PPL, a company that relies on skilled, technology-minded employees, maintain an engaged STEM workforce?

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High school robotics students are engineering the future

Students in Easton High School’s (EHS) Technology Student Association (TSA) built Bella, a fully functioning robot that picks up rings, balls and other items at the beck and call of a student programmer. The students competed with Bella at the 2017 Pennsylvania state TSA competition in April and earned a top-10 finish in the robotics division.

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Sparking inspiration

Even though Abby Delserone grew up in a family of utility workers — her cousin, uncle and grandfather all worked in the power industry — an engineering career wasn’t always on her radar. “I was originally applying to colleges as a psychology major,” she said. “I really didn’t have much exposure to STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) careers. I wish I would’ve had a broader sense of career opportunities in high school.”

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Building tomorrow’s leaders

As part of her role as a senior talent management consultant, Sue Drabic rolls out the welcome mat for Pennsylvania-based PPL employees. Drabic and other members of the Human Resources team host new employee orientation, where they spend time teaching the values and vision of PPL.

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Delivering reliable power – responsibly

Scott Straight is pretty proud — and for good reason. In 2016, the then director of Project Engineering at LG&E and KU oversaw the final stages of a multi-year, $2.8 billion construction project to add environmental controls to four of the company’s coal-fired power plants to further reduce emissions and improve operations.

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Caring for our customers

Everyone can agree that losing power is an unwelcome disruption. Life is less comfortable when you can’t watch TV and there’s no hot water for a warm shower. But if you are a vulnerable customer, a loss of power can be more than just an inconvenience. You may not have the money to replace the groceries that spoil during a lengthy outage. Or you may face a serious medical crisis if you rely on electricity to keep a heart monitor or oxygen machine operating.

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